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Electric Vs. Traditional Toothbrush – Which Is Better?

Electric Vs. Traditional Toothbrush – Which Is Better?

There’s a growing selection of dental supplies available in the market today and these are in line with the call for making a strong commitment to oral health. Among the many options today are different kinds of toothbrushes.

In terms of designs, the choices can prove to be overwhelming. However, if you’re more focused on function, the only issue really is whether to choose an electric toothbrush or a traditional toothbrush.

Electric vs Traditional Toothbrush

It’s imperative to establish that both items do the job well. The main difference is that the battery or electrically powered option can make the task easier because it does the brushing for you. Children, in particular, can benefit from this mechanism, especially since they’re still honing their motor skills.

Another advantage provided by electric toothbrushes is that they can be a time-saver. The head can stroke teeth 6,000 to 30,000 times per minute. Therefore, it works so much faster in getting teeth’s surface clean; this means that instead of the usual two to three minutes of brushing advised by dentists, you can cut that time in half.

As for the disadvantage with electric toothbrushes, even the cheapest brands you find in the market are still more expensive than most manual toothbrushes. It’s important to mention that the bristles tend to get worn faster too, and at times, the vibration of the heads can prove to be too much for people with sensitive teeth and gums.

Manual toothbrushes, on the other hand, are what everybody’s more familiar with. They’re much easier to control, so if you have sensitive spots around your mouth, you don’t have to worry about excessive vibrations.

When it comes to efficacy, a manual’s toothbrush will work well if you know how to brush your teeth well for that perfect smile. Therefore, if you tend to just speed through brushing your teeth, you’re not going to get your chompers thoroughly clean, says a Prescott, AZ dentist.

As for cost, even the most expensive manual toothbrush won’t cost as much as a branded electric toothbrush. It’s definitely a winner as a cost-effective option.

The con with this option, however, is the difficulty some people have in using it. Those who have arthritic hands and fingers will find it hard to brush thoroughly; ditto with young children who still do not have refined motor skills.

There you go – one is not necessarily better than the other. It’s best to choose one kind of toothbrush over the other based on your preference or the limitations you have. Schedule your appointment with one of our dentists today!


6 Dental Issues That Require Oral Surgery

6 Dental Issues That Require Oral Surgery

Most types of surgery can automatically strike fear in some people; however, some are performed rather quickly, and recovery from them is usually speedy.

Oral surgery, for example, is one that usually doesn’t take long to perform and is required for certain dental issues. A Prescott, AZ dentist lists six of the most common dental issues that he treats effectively through oral surgery.

  • Biopsies

When there are lesions in the mouth, dentists try to establish right away if they’re early signs of mouth cancer. Through simple oral surgery, they can remove a small piece of tissue for analysis.

This popular restorative solution consists of two to three oral surgeries so that new, natural-looking teeth will feel and function like original teeth. It involves “opening” the gums so metal posts can be implanted into the jawbone in order to enable gum tissue and bone to fuse over time.

  • Facial Injury

Teeth that have been knocked out and broken jaws are treated through oral surgery in order to restore function and appearance.

  • Impacted Wisdom Teeth

Most wisdom teeth do not cut through gums properly, creating great discomfort for many. They are surgically removed to get rid of pain and also to preserve the structural integrity of surrounding teeth.

  • Misaligned Jaws

There are all sorts of discomforts for people with misaligned jaws. Not only that, this issue affects appearance and function as well. Oral surgery can take care of the problem for enhanced physical appearance and proper, painless functioning.

  • Sleep Apnea

This condition can lead to even more serious health woes and a simple oral surgery that removes excess tissue from the back of the throat can improve sleep quality and reduce other symptoms of the condition.

Although oral surgery is rarely as complex as other surgical procedures, it demands proper aftercare. No matter how quick and simple it was, the right aftercare is necessary to ensure speedy recovery.

The Prescott, AZ dentist recommends taking prescribed pain relievers for tenderness, sensitivity and pain. He likewise says it’s important to avoid any type of physical exertion that will cause blood to flow to the head, and to use ice packs to reduce swelling. It’s important as well to stick to soft food for a while to avoid disturbing the treated area, loading up on vitamin C to speed up cell regeneration and the body’s overall ability to recover, and frequently but gently cleaning the mouth with a mild solution to prevent infection.


 Common Reasons People Need Dentures

Common Reasons People Need Dentures

If you are one of those who have been religiously observing proper oral care since you were young, chances are you won’t be needing dentures when you get old. But if you are one of those who constantly put off regular brushing or call off dentist appointments, then you may find yourself needing dentures as you age.

A denture, commonly known as false teeth, is a removable replacement for missing teeth and gums. It can either be full or partial, depending on your needs, and your dentist will help you choose the type that is best for you.

It is also worth noting that there are several situations wherein you might need dentures. A Prescott, AZ dentist states the common reasons people need dentures below:

  1. Loss of natural teeth

The loss of natural teeth, whether from tooth decay or injury, is one of the primary reasons people need dentures. Tooth loss due to mouth disease does not happen at once, unlike accidents or injury. It is a gradual process that starts when you neglect caring for your pearly whites.

Having said so, losing one or more of your teeth due to decay and gum disease is avoidable, yet it still remains to be among the top reasons for getting dentures.

  1. Difficulty chewing and speaking

Dentures might not be your first choice, but when you are missing some teeth, you may find it difficult to chew certain types of food and to speak properly. When this happens, getting a set of dentures may become your best option.

Because the front teeth are important in speech, pronouncing certain words becomes challenging when you are missing some of your teeth. Denture placement can restore essential oral functions like chewing and speaking.

  1. Facial sagging or altered facial contour

Missing or underdeveloped teeth causes the facial muscles to sag and the facial contour to alter and appear hollow. Dentures help individuals have an improved appearance by filling out their facial features. This will help individuals gain back their self-confidence or self-esteem.

New dentures may feel awkward at first and it will take some getting used to. It will require practice to speak and eat with your dentures on, but your dentist will help you deal with some of the challenges you may experience.

Caring for your dentures is also important to ensure that they will last a long time. Careful handling is also vital because they are delicate and can easily break. Of course, regular dental checkups are still necessary even if you have dentures on.


Dental Health Care And Aging

What You Should Know About Dental Health And Aging

Aging brings about various indications of physical, physiological, and mental degeneration. Dental health is among the most common concerns for older adults. As you get older, the risk of experiencing dental problems also increases.

Because of impairments in the normal bodily processes associated with aging, older people may find it more challenging to perform oral hygiene and self-care.

The most common dental conditions experienced during old age are:

Dry mouth (Xerostomia)

The golden years are considered cavity prone years. Cavities during old age are commonly caused by dry mouth. Xerostomia or dry mouth is not a normal process in aging; rather, it is a result or a side effect of various medications, which are usually taken by older adults to treat or control high blood pressure, Parkinson’s disease, and other illnesses that come with aging.

Dry mouth can lead to cracked lips, fissured tongue, caries, and mucositis. A Prescott, AZ dentist recommends increased fluid intake and avoidance of alcoholic and carbonated beverages to relieve the symptoms of dry mouth and prevent cavities.

Periodontitis or gum disease

Dental health and aging are linked together in many ways. As a person grows older, he may start to experience receding gums, which exposes the roots of the teeth. This increases the risk of developing decay.

In addition, poor dental hygiene also causes the buildup of plaque, causing the gums to become irritated and swollen.

In general, gum disease, in its early stages, is painless and does not present any symptoms. As such, it is often left undiagnosed and untreated until it is in the advanced stages. Advanced gum disease affects not only the gums, but also the bones and ligaments supporting the teeth.

Good oral hygiene through regular and proper brushing are very helpful in preventing periodontitis. Regular visits to a dentist for professional cleaning are also advised to remove hardened plaque.

Root and coronal caries

The four elements needed for dental caries to form are the tooth surface (enamel or dentin), fermentable carbohydrates, bacteria, and time. Dental caries could lead to advanced gum disease and tooth loss when left untreated.

Regular brushing using fluoride-containing toothpaste remains to be the main preventive measure for dental caries.

Because older adults may not be fully capable of caring for themselves, it is important to have a caregiver who can help them maintain their personal hygiene, including dental care. It is essential to discuss dental care and self-care with professionals such as dentists and doctors.


5 Things You’re Doing That Cause Bleeding Gums

5 Things You’re Doing That Cause Bleeding Gums

Habits That Cause Bleeding Gums

Do your gums often bleed? That probably happens often because of certain practices. It may also be due to health conditions that you’re not aware of. If you wish for your mouth to be healthier and for bleeding to stop, it’s crucial to know the real causes.

So, what usually causes bleeding gums?

You floss too hard.

Flosses can often cut through the fleshy tissues of your gums if you don’t know how to handle them properly. Also, there are flossers that really are too sharp, so even if you’re careful, they cut your gums anyway. Get instructions from your dentist on how to properly floss to prevent injuring your gums, or how to be more meticulous in choosing flossers for your teeth. Perhaps invest in sonic air floss, which uses a strong jet stream of water instead of a waxed string to dislodge food debris between teeth and gums.

Brushing too thoroughly with a hard-bristled brush.

If you think a hard-bristled brush performs better in getting rid of food particles, bacteria and germs in the mouth, you’re wrong. Such a toothbrush can leave scratches on your teeth’s enamel and they can also cut your gums especially if you brush too hard. Use a soft-bristled brush instead and brush more gently to prevent scratching both your teeth and gums.

You’re using a mouth appliance that doesn’t fit well.

The wrong fit of mouth appliances (such as dentures and mouth guards) can constantly put pressure on teeth and gums, and this can lead to bleeding. They can also move out of place, especially when you’re eating or talking, which can injure your gums. This is why it’s imperative to visit your dentist regularly and have him check the fit of the mouth appliance you’re using.

You don’t brush regularly.

Not brushing regularly encourages the proliferation of disease-causing bacteria in the mouth. Gum bleeding is one of the symptoms of periodontal disease and if this gum disease is not treated right away, it’s not just gum bleeding you’ll experience — you may lose your teeth eventually as well.

You’re taking medication.

There are certain drugs for the treatment of certain illnesses that have a blood-thinning effect. If you take these regularly, gum bleeding is always a risk. Therefore, you should consult your physician on what you can do to reverse this side effect of your medication, or perhaps have him recommend a different drug that doesn’t have this particular side effect.


Relaxing at the Dentist: Facts About the 4 Sedation Dentistry Types

Relaxing at the Dentist: Facts About the 4 Sedation Dentistry Types

From a simple tooth cleaning to invasive procedures, using sedation is a great technique to get patients relaxing at the dentist. How it will be used will depend on the patient’s level of fear or comfort.
Sedation dentistry makes use of a certain medication to help patients feel relaxed while undergoing dental procedures. According to a Prescott, AZ dentist, the levels of sedation used will include the following:

Minimal sedation. The patient is awake but relaxed.
Moderate sedation. The patient may slur his words when speaking and won’t remember much of the procedure.
Deep sedation. The patient is on the edge of consciousness.  General anesthesia. The patient will become completely unconscious.

4 Types of Sedation Dentistry

1. Inhaled Sedation
Nitrous oxide, also known as laughing gas, is the common agent used for inhaled sedation. This is a colorless, odorless and non-irritating kind of gas. It is combined with oxygen and administered via nasal cannula or face mask a few minutes before the procedure. The gas will help the patient feel relaxed. This type of sedation is used only for procedures that will allow patients to go home right after the procedure.
2. Oral Sedation
Oral sedation will have minimal to moderate effectiveness. The patient will just take a pill an hour before the procedure for minimal sedation. A larger dose will be given to produce moderate sedation.
Generally, this is the commonly used type of sedation dentistry. The patient will feel drowsy and groggy, and can even fall asleep. However, he can still be easily awakened by gentle stimuli. After the procedure, he will need assistance on his way home since the sedative effect of the drug can still be active.
3. Intravenous Sedation
Intravenous or IV sedation, otherwise known as deep dental sedation, is an invasive procedure. The anesthetic medication will be administered through the intravenous route. Since the medication is directly delivered into the bloodstream, it causes rapid effects. It will instantly lower the patient’s ability to recognize any stimuli.
IV sedation will provide a higher degree of muscle relaxation, so it requires very strict monitoring before, during and after the dental procedures. The patient will also be assessed for allergies to any IV medication and the existence of other comorbid medical conditions. This type of sedation dentistry will allow the dentist to continuously regulate the level of sedation.
4. General Anesthesia
General anesthesia will make the patient completely unconscious. In other words, he will be in a deep sleep with reduced sensory perception. Since this type of sedation has a very high sedative effect, constant patient monitoring must be done during the dental procedure. Medications will be administered via face mask. After the procedure, the patient will feel uncomfortable and dizzy, so assistance is highly advised for those who will undergo this type of sedation dentistry.

For patients who need help relaxing at the dentist, sedation dentistry is highly indicated. Also, this is used for those who have phobias undergoing dental procedures and those suffering from mental health conditions. So call us to schedule your appointment today!


Get to know Dr. Reed – Prescott Dentist

Are you new in Prescott, AZ and you’re looking for reputable Dentist who can take care of your family’s dental care needs?

Meet Dr. Reed – make that Dr. Sean Reed, one of the most trusted dentists in the Prescott community. He’s been working at Horizon Dental Care in Prescott, AZ for many years now. Dr. Reed is a proud member of the community and enjoys raising his family here.

Originally from Chicago, IL and Denver, CO, life took him to Brigham Young University in Utah where he obtained his Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology and minor in Spanish. After this, he moved to New York to secure his Doctor of Dental Surgery degree at NYU.

He then returned to Utah for his yearlong residency in general dentistry at the University of Utah and now he’s enjoying his career as one of the leading providers of superior dental services to the locals of Prescott. Dr. Costes recognized Dr. Reed’s talent and hired him on as an associate and eventually a partner in our Prescott office.

Dr. Reed is a beloved personality in Prescott. He is known for building strong relationships with his patients by getting to know their families, and carefully listening to their concerns so he’s able to deliver results and ensure a positive experience for each and every one of them.

Patients have consistently provided him great reviews because they appreciate his sincerity and the dedication he displays. Likewise, they laud him for being very helpful with all of their concerns. He doesn’t cut corners when it comes to the true state of a person’s oral health, and he always makes sure to explain concerns in the most comprehensible way possible for patients, which is why patients say they remain loyal to Horizon Dental Group.

Loyal patients of Horizontal Dental Group also pointed out that Dr. Reed doesn’t only pay attention to dental concerns; he also carefully tackles his patients’ nerves. He is well aware that there are people who have dental phobia, or are just very nervous about unfamiliar procedures, or are simply the nervous kind. Dr. Reed is very patient and does his best to help patients overcome the jitters. He assures each and every one of them of the safety of treatments and even provides tips on how patients can personally deal with their nerves.

So, if you’re looking for a dentist you can trust for your family in Prescott, visit Horizontal Dental Group’s clinic (which also has a branch in Chino Valley) and meet Dr. Reed – the friendly dental expert of the community.


Wisdom Teeth: Should They Stay or Should They Go?

As you approach or go through your early 20s, you may think that you’re just about done with all the growing and developing that your body does. By this time, you think to yourself, you ought to have successfully hurdled the crucial biological stages and are now ready to live life to the fullest.

Unfortunately, typically from the ages of 17 and 21, you will still be going through some significant changes. In particular, your teeth aren’t all fully and perfectly erupted at this point — you may still discover your wisdom teeth beginning to emerge.

Why the name, wisdom teeth?

These teeth are called such because they appear in a person’s mouth when they are at a slightly older and ideally wiser age.

You may indeed be older, but you can still feel pain all the same — and pain is something that wisdom teeth usually create. Sometimes these teeth come through correctly, but more often than not, there is no longer enough space for them to emerge properly in the right position. Wisdom teeth often become impacted, which means that they are unable to come out from under the jaw and to the surface of the gums.

Should you have your wisdom teeth removed?

Your dentist can closely monitor the development of your wisdom teeth. With regular brushing, flossing and check-ups with your dentist, wisdom teeth that come out correctly can help you chew better and cause no issues at all.

However, if you notice some of the following signs, your wisdom teeth may become increasingly problematic as time goes on:

  • Your wisdom teeth are starting to crowd or even cause damage to your other teeth
  • You feel pain and some swelling in the jaw caused by a bacterial infection to a partially erupted wisdom tooth
  • Food is often trapped around an improperly erupted wisdom tooth, leading to cavities
  • A cyst forms near the impacted tooth, putting the surrounding teeth’s roots as well as the bone supporting the teeth at risk

Thorough and routine examinations of your mouth, along with x-rays of the affected area, can help your dentist determine if removing the wisdom teeth is the ideal solution to your particular dental situation. Removal is also often recommended if you are being treated for certain other dental conditions and if you will be getting braces.

Talk to your trusted Prescott, AZ dentist about the best options for your teeth and find out whether your wisdom teeth can prove to be beneficial for you.


How Does Sugar Cause Tooth Decay?

How Does Sugar Cause Tooth Decay?

Since you were a young kid, you’ve heard the adults tell you to limit your consumption of sugary treats. They reasoned out that food laden with sugar can lead to tooth decay, or even worse, tooth loss.

“How does sugar cause tooth decay?” you might ask.

It’s actually not the sugar in food

Contrary to what you may have heard, it is not exactly sugar itself that causes tooth decay and other dental problems.

Sugar is just one of the major factors involved in a series of events that occur after eating sugary and starchy food.

A glimpse into your mouth’s eco-system

Much as you would like to believe that your mouth is clean and free from bacteria, the truth is that it is home to hundreds of bacteria.

Now, some of these bacteria may be harmful, but there are also beneficial bacteria that can be found inside your mouth.

When you consume food rich in sugar, you are essentially feeding the harmful bacteria in your mouth. Some of the bacteria in your mouth feed on sugar and then release acids.

In turn, these acids corrode the teeth’s enamel, the protective layer of the tooth. Over time, these acids can create a hole in your teeth. Left unchecked, these holes can go to the deeper layers of the teeth which lead to toothaches and even tooth loss.

Little helpers inside your mouth

Your teeth are constantly bombarded by acids that corrode the enamel. But your teeth are not defenseless.

The acids in your mouth remove minerals from the enamel through a process known as demineralization.

But another key process takes place inside your mouth: remineralization. In this process, the minerals leeched away from the teeth’s enamel are replaced and the teeth are strengthened.

Your saliva plays a crucial role in this process, providing the teeth with minerals like calcium and phosphate. These minerals help repair the teeth.

Your teeth need your help

However, the saliva can only do so much. When you eat too much sugary and starchy food, your teeth has little time to repair themselves.

This is why it is crucial to limit your intake of treats laden with sugars and starch.

But apart from limiting your consumption of sugars and starches, a Prescott, AZ dentist says there are a few other things that you can do to protect your teeth against cavities.

For one, you should add more fruits and veggies to your diet. These facilitate the production of more saliva. Dairy products, on the other hand, are rich in the minerals that help strengthen the teeth. Drinking green and black teas can also control the population of harmful bacteria in your mouth.

Dentists also recommend drinking fluoridated water and brushing the teeth with a fluoride toothpaste. Fluoride can help prevent tooth decay and even reverse it during the early stages. Schedule an appointment with our doctors today!


All About Dental Bone Graft Procedures

When it comes to restorative dentistry, dental implants generate the most interest. Unlike other procedures, implants achieve the feel and function of original teeth the best. It’s like you never lost your teeth at all.

However, to be a good candidate for dental implants, you need to have enough bone density to securely anchor the implants. If you don’t, additional work needs to be carried out.

Dental bone graft is performed for patients whose bone under the gums is not wide, tall or dense enough. This procedure is a rather complex one, so it greatly increases the overall cost of dental implant surgery.

To further understand this crucial treatment that is included in some dental implant procedures, listed below are things you need to know all about dental bone graft procedures.

  • This process will rebuild or replace bone in the jaw to support dental implants. Bone loss is usually caused by periodontal disease, trauma, an abscess, or aging and not having teeth for a long time already.
  • Bone grafts make use of bone (cadaver, cow, patient’s own bone) or bone-like material (synthetic bone).

  • An oral surgeon, prosthodontist or periodontist commonly performs extensive bone grafts several months before the dental implants.

  • A single bone graft using bone from a cow, cadaver or synthetic bone can cost between $250 and $1100. Meanwhile, for bone graft using the patient’s own bone, the procedure can cost between $2000 and $3000 – obviously more expensive as it includes two surgical sites, anesthesia and hospitalization.

  • The cost of bone grafts is dependent on the following factors:

  • size and shape of the surgical site, source material used, and where the bone is harvested from.

  • Additional costs can be expected, and they’re for X-rays, CT scans and consultation fee of other specialists.

  • Dental insurance normally doesn’t cover the cost of dental implants but may cover a portion of the cost of a dental bone graft due to bone loss’s impact on a person’s wellbeing.

  • The safest graft material is your own bone because it naturally integrates well and there’s no risk of infectious disease, tissue rejection and contamination. This is usually harvested from the chin, jaw, shin or hip.

  • Least ideal bone graft material is synthetic bone. While it’s second to your own bone when it comes to safety, this material is absorbed by the body and needs to be replaced over time.

  • Lastly, recovery from bone grafting usually takes about four to nine months so it’s a long waiting time before dental implant surgery can be performed. During the recovery/waiting period, you are expected to consistently practice proper oral care and to follow a healthy diet to ensure the success of the dental implant.

To know if a dental bone graft procedure is right for you, contact your trusted Prescott, AZ dentist.